International Coastal Cleanups at Salter Grove

Save the Bay hosted a corporate cleanup event at Salter Grove in 2019

Salter Grove plays an important role in the struggle for the health of the oceans as one of the settings of the International Coastal Cleanup (ICC) organized by the Ocean Conservancy and Save the Bay.

Each year, volunteers around the world join together in both cleaning beaches and documenting the waste and pollution that they find. The Ocean Conservancy launched this project over 30 years ago.

Salter Grove is the site of three of the 30 ICC events this year planned by Save the Bay as the Rhode Island State Coordinator. The first took place on September 11, which also coincided with the National Day of Service and Remembrance commemorating the 2001 terrorism attacks in New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Another public volunteer cleanup is scheduled for September 25, and a corporate group will do a cleanup in October.

This year’s total is one event shy of the 2019 record, when Salter Grove hosted four ICC cleanups and over 70 volunteers.

Additional ICC events are happening around the state. Last year, even with the partial shutdown of activities due to the Covid-19 pandemic, nearly 600 volunteers joined in the ICC, collecting more than 4,000 pounds of trash from Rhode Island Shores.

Top three trash items collected in 2020 RI International Coastal Cleanups:
11,662 cigarette butts
5,250 plastic pieces (under 2.5 centimeters)
2,623 plastic bottle caps
Source: 2020 International Coastal Cleanup / Rhode Island Report & Call To Action.

The efforts of individual volunteers and Save the Bay groups have improved the trash control situation at Salter Grove, but more needs to be done. Food and beverage packaging left behind by recreational visitors and washed in by the waves still pollutes the area and poses risks to wildlife.

Volunteer efforts are gradually bouncing back with the reopening of normal activity in the state. The number of volunteers per cleanup has returned to a little more than 60% of the 2019 average.

If you are interested in participating in a public cleanup and at least 13 years of age, visit Save the Bay and learn how to register. 

Salter Grove’s Own Mr. Clean

Paul Joutras, always a friendly smile.

Many long-time visitors to Salter Grove have commented on the how clean the park looks now compared to previous years. Besides the biweekly Save the Bay cleanups organized by FoSG member Andy Lohmeier and regular patrols by member Jason Major, we have Paul Joutras to thank.

As an employee of Warwick’s Department of Public Works, Paul is responsible for emptying the trash barrels in Warwick city parks. Ever since he has come on board, the barrels at Salter Grove do not stay full for long. Moreover, he picks up litter strewn by inconsiderate visitors all around the parking lot. Thank you Paul! 

Paul goes beyond his job description to keep the park clean. 

First Formal Cleanup in 2020

Community volunteers organized by Save The Bay and informal volunteers committed to keeping Salter Grove clean joined forces on September 1st.

Two more cleanups are scheduled for 2020: Saturday, October 3 from 3 to 5 p.m. and Saturday, November 7 from 2 to 4 p.m. Please sign up here and come enjoy the wonderful views while helping! No walk-ins please—due to Covid regulations, only signed up volunteers will be accepted.

Continue reading

FoSG Preservation Network and November 25 Cleanup

Those who stayed to the chill end of the cleanup on November 25. Two of the three co-leaders (besides Trent Batson who took the photo) are in the picture: 3rd from left is Casey Gonsalves and 4th from left is Mary Newton.

Friends of Salter Grove has formed a volunteer Preservation Network to help keep Salter Grove clean and attractive. Save the Bay and FoSG have partnered on cleanups since FoSG started in 2016. But, in order to guarantee regular cleanups at Salter Grove, including during the winter months (when weather permits), we formed the Network in the past few months.

Continue reading

Join the FoSG Preservation Network!

Friends of Salter Grove, in affiliation with Save the Bay, has created a Preservation Network to maintain Salter Grove as a clean and inviting family park for recreational use.

Members of the Network will meet at least twice a month as a group to do a thorough cleanup of the Park. With five current members we are looking for an additional ten. Anyone can apply, no matter your age or physical condition.

We are asking for a one-year commitment to the Network if you are accepted as a member. You will not need to participate in all scheduled cleanups but we do hope that most members will join scheduled cleanups.

Network cleanups will be scheduled according to members’ availability, during the week or on weekends. We will also schedule around low tide times so we can venture out onto the causeway and breakwater for cleanup there.

All members of the Network will sign release forms from Save the Bay and will receive Save the Bay training. If you are under 18, your parent or guardian will also need to sign Save the Bay’s release form.

To apply for membership, respond to https://volunteer.savebay.org/need/detail/?need_id=376202 or send an email directly to Network coordinator Trent Batson at trentbatson@mac.com.

The first in-person meeting of this Network will occur at 10:00 a.m. at Salter Grove on Sunday, October 21.

Another Successful Cleanup!

cleanup_9-11-18On September 11, Save the Bay provided volunteers from Citizens Bank and Jet Blue to clean up Salter Grove. FoSG led the effort with significant help from two STB interns.

The cleanup was part of the International Coastal Cleanup sponsored by the Ocean Conservancy in Washington DC. Each three-person team filled in detailed data cards that the interns aggregated so it could be sent on to the Conservancy for their annual state of the ocean report. A volunteer who does cleanups regularly said that Salter Grove is unusually clean compared to other parks around the Bay.

STB has provided corporate groups for Salter Grove cleanups all summer long.

Read the story about this in the Warwick Beacon here.